A quick guide on how to understand asexual people!
An asexual person is someone who does not experience sexual attraction. However, there are some asexuals who can feel sexually attracted to someone under very specific circumstances and/or very rarely. They include, but are not limited to; demi-sexuals and grey-asexuals. 
While asexuals don’t experience any sexual attraction, they can feel romantic attraction. There are just as many romantic orientations as sexual orientations. A few examples are homo-romantic, demi-romantic, a-romantic and pan-romantic. Asexuals can want romantic relationships that may or may not include sexual activities. 



Being asexual is not the same thing as being celibate. 
Asexuality is not a choice, just like ever other sexuality; while Celibacy is making the distinct choice of not having sex, usually despite being sexually attracted to people. On a related note, not all asexuals are celibate. 

An asexual is not going to “change”!
Someone who is born asexual is just as likely or unlikely to “change” as someone who is born heterosexual or homosexual. Sexuality is a fluid thing, and quite a few people experience change through their lifetime. However, assuming that an asexual person can be “fixed” by meeting the “right person” is not only wrong, but deeply insulting.

Asexuality is not a disorder!
You cannot choose your sexuality. Just like every other sexuality out there, asexuals are born that way and have no choice in the matter. Most asexuals are perfectly happy being the way they are, and insinuating anything else is plain rude.

Asexuality does not mean an aversion to touching!
Just like every other group of people, asexuals are individuals. some like to hug, some would rather you didn’t touch them at all. Some don’t mind, or even like, having sex; while others are sex repulsed (sometimes to the point of feeling physically ill just thinking about it). If you are uncertain about what a specific person is ok with, you should ask them. 

Most asexuals have not been sexually abused!
As wikiHow sums it up;
"There is no known cause for being asexual, just as there is no known cause for any other sexual orientations."
(source)

A quick guide on how to understand asexual people!

An asexual person is someone who does not experience sexual attraction. However, there are some asexuals who can feel sexually attracted to someone under very specific circumstances and/or very rarely. They include, but are not limited to; demi-sexuals and grey-asexuals. 

While asexuals don’t experience any sexual attraction, they can feel romantic attraction. There are just as many romantic orientations as sexual orientations. A few examples are homo-romantic, demi-romantic, a-romantic and pan-romantic. Asexuals can want romantic relationships that may or may not include sexual activities. 

Being asexual is not the same thing as being celibate.

Asexuality is not a choice, just like ever other sexuality; while Celibacy is making the distinct choice of not having sex, usually despite being sexually attracted to people. On a related note, not all asexuals are celibate. 

An asexual is not going to “change”!

Someone who is born asexual is just as likely or unlikely to “change” as someone who is born heterosexual or homosexual. Sexuality is a fluid thing, and quite a few people experience change through their lifetime. However, assuming that an asexual person can be “fixed” by meeting the “right person” is not only wrong, but deeply insulting.

Asexuality is not a disorder!

You cannot choose your sexuality. Just like every other sexuality out there, asexuals are born that way and have no choice in the matter. Most asexuals are perfectly happy being the way they are, and insinuating anything else is plain rude.

Asexuality does not mean an aversion to touching!

Just like every other group of people, asexuals are individuals. some like to hug, some would rather you didn’t touch them at all. Some don’t mind, or even like, having sex; while others are sex repulsed (sometimes to the point of feeling physically ill just thinking about it). If you are uncertain about what a specific person is ok with, you should ask them. 

Most asexuals have not been sexually abused!

As wikiHow sums it up;

"There is no known cause for being asexual, just as there is no known cause for any other sexual orientations."

(source)

Ask an asexual

After having run across yet another person who had not heard the term asexual before, I decided to open this blog.

It’s open for anyone who wants to ask a question, anytime!

While I will do my best to be informative and answer your questions fully, keep in mind that I am one person with one experience and one viewpoint. Something that goes for me, might not go for the next person.

I also promise to answer all honest questions without being offended. I’ve probably already heard it. However, I will never publish anything hateful or derogatory!

Looking forward to meet you all!